Injections

Xolair

XOLAIR® (omalizumab) for subcutaneous use is an injectable prescription medicine used to treat moderate to severe persistent asthma in patients 6 years of age or older whose asthma symptoms are not controlled by asthma medicines called inhaled corticosteroids.  It is also used to treat chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU; chronic hives without a known cause) in patients 12 years of age and older who continue to have hives that are not controlled by H1 antihistamine treatment. 

Xolair is given in 1 or more injections under the skin (subcutaneous), 1 time every 2 or 4 weeks.

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Nucala

NUCALA is an add-on, prescription maintenance treatment for patients 12 and older with severe eosinophilic asthma. NUCALA is not used to treat sudden breathing problems.

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Fasenra

FASENRA is an add-on maintenance treatment for patients aged 12 and older with severe eosinophilic asthma. FASENRA is not an inhaler or a steroid. FASENRA is an injection given by a healthcare provider—one dose every 8 weeks after the first 2 months. 

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Influenza

Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently, but millions of people get the flu every year, hundreds of thousands of people are hospitalized and thousands or tens of thousands of people die from flu-related causes every year.  

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.

The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. Traditional flu vaccines (called “trivalent” vaccines) are made to protect against three flu viruses; an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus. There are also flu vaccines made to protect against four flu viruses (called “quadrivalent” vaccines). These vaccines protect against the same viruses as the trivalent vaccine and an additional B virus.

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Pneumonia

Pneumococcal disease is common in young children, but older adults are at greatest risk of serious illness and death. There are two kinds of vaccines that help prevent pneumococcal disease. 

CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children younger than 2 years old and all adults 65 years or older. In certain situations, other children and adults should also get pneumococcal vaccines. 

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Allergy Shots