Office Services

Full Consultations and Follow-ups

Spirometry Tests

Spirometry is a common office test used to assess how well your lungs work by measuring how much air you inhale, how much you exhale and how quickly you exhale.  It is used to diagnose asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other conditions that affect breathing. Spirometry may also be used periodically to monitor your lung condition and check whether a treatment for a chronic lung condition is helping you breathe better.

Pulmonary Function Tests

Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are noninvasive tests that show how well the lungs are working. The tests measure lung volume, capacity, rates of flow, and gas exchange. This information can help your healthcare provider diagnose and decide the treatment of certain lung disorders.

You may have a PFT if your healthcare provider needs help to diagnose you with a health problem such as:

  • Allergies
  • Respiratory infections
  • Trouble breathing from injury to the chest or a recent surgery
  • Chronic lung conditions, such as asthma, bronchiectasis, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis
  • Asbestosis, a lung disease caused by inhaling asbestos fibers
  • Restrictive airway problems from scoliosis, tumors, or inflammation or scarring of the lungs
  • Sarcoidosis, a disease that causes lumps of inflammatory cells around organs, such as the liver, lungs, and spleen
  • Scleroderma, a disease that causes thickening and hardening of connective tissue

PFTs may be used to check lung function before surgery or other procedures in patients who have lung or heart problems, who are smokers, or who have other health conditions. Another use of PFTs is to assess treatment for asthma, emphysema, and other chronic lung problems. Your healthcare provider may also have other reasons to advise PFTs.

Polysomnography - Unattended Sleep Studies

An attended sleep study, also called a Home Sleep Study, is a sleep study tool that is used for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea. Most HST devices are portable – about the size of a telephone handset. 

They usually measure the following biologic parameters:

  • Nasal and Oral Airflow – by thin wire that is taped by the nose and mouth – some sensors look like an oxygen cannula.
  • Respiratory Effort – by elastic belt bands that are placed across the chest and abdomen.
  • Oximeter Finger Probe – a small clip-like device that attaches to the finger tip and emits a red light that assists in the evaluation of oxygen levels in the blood while sleeping.

A patient is usually ordered a HST by his or her doctor who suspects that the individual has obstructive sleep apnea. The patient usually applies the above mentioned sensors to the body before sleep time and sleeps with the equipment for 1 – 3 nights. The equipment is returned to the diagnostic service company where the data is downloaded and processed for interpretation by a sleep physician.

Once the data is interpreted by a sleep physician, a diagnostic interpretation report is sent back to the ordering physician who discusses the results of the home sleep testing.

6 Minute Walk Tests

The 6 minute walk test measures the distance someone can walk quickly on a flat, hard surface in 6 minutes. The test reflects the person’s ability to perform daily physical activities. Because COPD affects everyone differently, lung function and exercise tolerance testing help doctors and patients work together to develop the best treatment plan.

The 6-minute walk test was developed as a valid alternative to standard treadmill-based exercise testing for people who are elderly or who cannot perform treadmill-based exercise testing. You may have another 6-minute walk test after a certain amount of time has passed to test how much you have improved, as well.

Flexible Fiberoptic Larynoscopy

In flexible laryngoscopy, a thin, flexible viewing tube (called a laryngoscope) is passed through the nose and guided to the vocal cords, or larynx. Fiberoptic cables permit a physician to directly inspect the nose, throat, and larynx for abnormalities.

The purpose of the laryngoscopy is:

  • To detect laryngeal abnormalities, such as inflammation, lesions, or narrowed passages (strictures)
  • To help diagnose the cause of a persistent or bloody cough, hoarseness, or throat pain
  • To determine the cause for difficulty swallowing or a feeling of a lump in the throat

Allergy Skin Testing - Food

Allergy Skin Testing - Environmental